Earthquake Information Center

Yellowstone Region Press Releases

This page contains Yellowstone Region Press Releases for the following dates (with the most recent press release listed first):

 

 

Press Release

University of Utah Seismograph Stations

Released: March 30, 2014 08:15 AM MDT

The University of Utah Seismograph Stations reports that a light earthquake occurred at 06:34 AM on March 30, 2014 (MDT). The epicenter of the magnitude 4.8 shock was located 4 miles north-northeast of Norris Geyser Basin in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. This earthquake is part of a series of earthquakes that began in this area on Thursday, March 27. As of 8:15 am today, this series has included at least 25 earthquakes in addition to the main shock, with the largest of magnitude 3.1. The magnitude 4.8 main shock was reported felt in Yellowstone National Park and in the towns of West Yellowstone and Gardiner, Montana.

Seismic information on the earthquake can be viewed at the University of Utah Seismograph Stations: http://www.seis.utah.edu/.

Seismograph recordings from stations of the Yellowstone seismograph network can be viewed online at: http://quake.utah.edu/helicorder/yell_webi.htm.

Anyone who has felt recent earthquakes in Yellowstone is encouraged to fill out a form on the USGS Community Felt reports web site: http://earthquake.usgs.gov/eqcenter/dyfi/.

 

 

 

University of Utah Seismograph Stations

Released: September 15, 2013 11:07 AM MDT

The University of Utah Seismograph Stations reports that a light earthquake of magnitude 3.6 occurred at 09:53:02 AM on September 15, 2013 (MDT) that was felt by persons in Yellowstone. The epicenter of the shock was located in Yellowstone National Park near the Lower Geyser Basin area, 8 miles north of Old Faithful, and 15 miles SE of the town of West Yellowstone, Montana. This earthquake is the largest of an ongoing sequence of swarms that began on September 10, 2013 and has included swarms near Lewis Lake, the Lower Geyser Basin and in an area NW of Norris Geyser Basin. A total of 130 earthquakes of magnitude 0.6 to 3.6 have occurred in these three areas however, most have occurred near the Lower Geyser Basin. Notably much of the seismicity in Yellowstone occurs as swarms. The University of Utah Seismograph Stations continues to monitor Yellowstone earthquakes and will provide additional information if the earthquake swarm activity increases.
Anyone who felt any of these earthquakes is encouraged to fill out a felt report on the U.S. Geological Survey website at: http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/dyfi/

Announcement

University of Utah Seismograph Stations

Released: October 1, 2010 8:00 AM MDT

Beginning October 1, 2010, the University of Utah Seismograph Stations has reduced the magnitude threshold for public web posting of automated earthquake locations and magnitudes for the Yellowstone region. The new minimum magnitude threshold is M 1.5, reduced from the previous threshold of M 2.5. The new threshold value will allow more earthquake information to be rapidly released to the public and other users. This lower magnitude threshold will be tested during a trial period and may be increased again.

Small earthquakes are common in the Yellowstone region. With the reduced magnitude threshold for web posting of automated earthquake locations and magnitudes, it will no longer be practical for seismologists to continue the practice of reviewing all of this information immediately after posting. Users of these data should be aware that an unreviewed earthquake report can be significantly in error and might even be a false alarm, regardless of the reported magnitude. The University of Utah Seismograph Stations will continue its policy of including only reviewed events in its finalized earthquake catalog.

 

 

 

Press Release

University of Utah Seismograph Stations

Released: February 03, 2010 10:00 AM MST

This release is a continuation of information updates building upon our five previous press releases on the ongoing earthquake swarm on the west side of Yellowstone National Park.

The University of Utah Seismograph Stations reports that a period of increased seismic activity occurred on February 2, 2010 beginning at ~3:30 PM MST.  This period of increased activity lasted about 6 hours and included at least 2 events that were reported felt in Yellowstone National Park.  The two largest earthquakes during this sequence were magnitude 3.1 and 2.8 that occurred at 7:31 PM and 7:44 PM respectively.

These earthquakes are part of an ongoing swarm in Yellowstone National Park that began January 17, 2010 (1:00 PM MST).  The largest earthquake in the swarm as of 7 AM MST, February 03, 2010, has been a magnitude 3.8.  There have been 1,719 located earthquakes in the swarm of magnitude 0.3 to 3.8.  This includes 14 events of magnitude larger than 3, with 135 events of magnitude 2 to 3, and 1,570 events of magnitude less than 2.  There have been multiple personal reports of ground shaking from observers inside the Park and in surrounding areas for some of the larger events (for felt reports, please visit http://earthquake.usgs.gov/eqcenter/dyfi/).  Earthquake swarms are relatively common in Yellowstone.

Yellowstone Volcano Observatory scientists still consider that the swarm events are likely the result of slip on pre-existing faults and are not thought to be caused by underground movement of magma. Currently there is no indication of premonitory volcanic or hydrothermal activity, but ongoing observations and analyses will continue to evaluate these different sources.

Seismic information on the earthquake can be viewed at the University of Utah Seismograph Stations: http://www.seis.utah.edu/.

Seismograph recordings from stations of the Yellowstone seismograph network can be viewed online at: http://quake.utah.edu/helicorder/yell_webi.htm.

Anyone who has felt earthquakes in the swarm are encouraged to fill out a form on the USGS Community Felt reports web site: http://earthquake.usgs.gov/eqcenter/dyfi/.

This press release was prepared by the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory partners of the U.S. Geol. Survey, the University of Utah, and the National Park Service: http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/yvo/

 

 

 

Press Release

University of Utah Seismograph Stations

Released: January 28, 2010 9:00 AM MST

This release is a continuation of information updates building upon our four previous press releases on the ongoing earthquake swarm on the west side of Yellowstone National Park.

The University of Utah Seismograph Stations reports that a pair of earthquakes of magnitude 3.1 and 3.2 occurred in Yellowstone National Park.  The magnitude 3.1 event occurred at 12:52 PM on January 27, 2010.  The magnitude 3.2 occurred on the morning of January 28, 2010 at 1:46 AM.  Both shocks were located around 9 miles to the southeast of West Yellowstone, MT and about 10 miles to the northwest of Old Faithful, WY.  Both earthquakes were reported felt in Yellowstone National Park.

These earthquakes are part of an ongoing swarm in Yellowstone National Park that began January 17, 2010 (1:00 PM MST).  The largest earthquake in the swarm as of 9 AM MST, January 28, 2010, has been a magnitude 3.8.  There have been 1,497 located earthquakes in the swarm of magnitude 0.4 to 3.8 up to 9AM January 28, 2010.  This includes 12 events of magnitude larger than 3, with 111 events of magnitude 2 to 3, and 1,374 events of magnitude less than 2.  There have been multiple personal reports of ground shaking from observers inside the Park and in surrounding areas for some of the larger events (for felt reports, please visit http://earthquake.usgs.gov/eqcenter/dyfi/).  Earthquake swarms are relatively common in Yellowstone.

Yellowstone Volcano Observatory scientists still consider that the swarm events are likely the result of slip on pre-existing faults and are not thought to be caused by underground movement of magma. Currently there is no indication of premonitory volcanic or hydrothermal activity, but ongoing observations and analyses will continue to evaluate these different sources.

 

Seismic information on the earthquake can be viewed at the University of Utah Seismograph Stations: http://www.seis.utah.edu/.

Seismograph recordings from stations of the Yellowstone seismograph network can be viewed online at: http://quake.utah.edu/helicorder/yell_webi.htm.

Anyone who has felt earthquakes in the swarm are encouraged to fill out a form on the USGS Community Felt reports web site: http://earthquake.usgs.gov/eqcenter/dyfi/.

This press release was prepared by the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory partners of the U.S. Geol. Survey, the University of Utah, and the National Park Service: http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/yvo/

 

Press Release

University of Utah Seismograph Stations

Released: January 25, 2010 12:00 PM MST

This release is a continuation of information updates building upon our three previous press releases on the ongoing earthquake swarm on the west side of Yellowstone National Park.

The University of Utah Seismograph Stations reports that a pair of earthquakes of magnitude 3.0 and 3.1 occurred in the evening of January 24, 2010 in Yellowstone National Park.  The first event of magnitude 3.0 occurred at 11:09 PM and was followed by a magnitude 3.1 event at 11:21 PM.  Both shocks were located around 9 miles to the southeast of West Yellowstone, MT and about 10 miles to the northwest of Old Faithful, WY.  Typically, events of this magnitude are felt in and around the Park, but there were no reports of these particular events being felt.

These two earthquakes are part of an ongoing swarm in Yellowstone National Park that began January 17, 2010 (1:00 PM MST).  The largest earthquake in the swarm as of 9 AM MST, January 25, 2010, has been a magnitude 3.8.  There have been 1,271 located earthquakes in the swarm of magnitude 0.5 to 3.8.  This includes 11 events of magnitude larger than 3, with 97 events of magnitude 2 to 3, and 1,163 events of magnitude less than 2.  There have been multiple personal reports of ground shaking from observers inside the Park and in surrounding areas for some of the larger events (for felt reports, please visit http://earthquake.usgs.gov/eqcenter/dyfi/).  Earthquake swarms are relatively common in Yellowstone.

The swarm events are likely the result of slip on pre-existing faults and are called tectonic earthquakes and are not thought to be caused by underground movement of magma. Currently there is no indication of premonitory volcanic or hydrothermal activity, but ongoing observations and analyses will continue to evaluate these different sources.

 

Seismic information on the earthquake can be viewed at the University of Utah Seismograph Stations: http://www.seis.utah.edu/.

Seismograph recordings from stations of the Yellowstone seismograph network can be viewed online at: http://quake.utah.edu/helicorder/yell_webi.htm.

Anyone who has felt earthquakes in the swarm are encouraged to fill out a form on the USGS Community Felt reports web site: http://earthquake.usgs.gov/eqcenter/dyfi/.

This press release was prepared by the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory partners of the U.S. Geol. Survey, the University of Utah, and the National Park Service: http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/yvo/

 

Press Release

University of Utah Seismograph Stations

Released: January 21, 2010 2:00 PM MST

This release is a continuation of information updates building upon our two previous press releases on the ongoing earthquake swarm on the west side of Yellowstone National Park. The University of Utah Seismograph Stations reports that a pair of earthquakes of magnitude 3.7 and 3.8 occurred in the evening of January 20, 2010 in Yellowstone National Park.

The first event of magnitude 3.7 occurred at 11:01 PM and was shortly followed by a magnitude 3.8 event at 11:16 PM. Both shocks were located around 9 miles to the southeast of West Yellowstone, MT and about 10 miles to the northwest of Old Faithful, WY. Both events were felt throughout the park and in surrounding communities in Wyoming, Montana, and Idaho.

These two earthquakes are part of an ongoing swarm in Yellowstone National Park that began January 17, 2010 (1:00 PM MST). The largest earthquake in the swarm as of 12 PM, January 21, 2010, was a magnitude 3.8. There have been 901 located earthquakes in the swarm of magnitude 0.5 to 3.8. This includes 8 events of magnitude larger than 3, with 68 events of magnitude 2 to 3, and 825 events of magnitude less than 2. There have been multiple personal reports of ground shaking from observations inside the Park and in surrounding areas for some of the larger events (for felt reports, please visit http://earthquake.usgs.gov/eqcenter/dyfi/). Earthquake swarms are relatively common in Yellowstone.

The swarm earthquakes are likely the result of slip on pre-existing faults rather than underground movement of magma. Currently there is no indication of premonitory volcanic or hydrothermal activity, but ongoing observations and analyses will continue to evaluate these different sources.

Seismic information on the earthquake can be viewed at the University of Utah Seismograph Stations: http://www.seis.utah.edu/.

Seismograph recordings from stations of the Yellowstone seismograph network can be viewed online at: http://quake.utah.edu/helicorder/yell_webi.htm.

Anyone who has felt earthquakes in the swarm are encouraged to fill out a form on the USGS Community Felt reports web site: http://earthquake.usgs.gov/eqcenter/dyfi/.

This press release was prepared by the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory partners of the U.S. Geol. Survey, the University of Utah, and the National Park Service: http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/yvo/

Press Release

University of Utah Seismograph Stations

Released: January 19, 2010 3:00 PM MST

The University of Utah Seismograph Stations reports an update of information on an ongoing earthquake swarm in Yellowstone National Park that began January 17, 2010 (1:00 PM MST).  The swarm is located about 10 miles northwest of Old Faithful, WY and 9 miles southeast of West Yellowstone, MT. The largest earthquake in the swarm as of 3 PM, January 19, 2010, was a magnitude 3.7 event that occurred at 2:31 PM, MST, January 19, 2010. and there have been 469 located earthquakes in the swarm of magnitudes 0.5 to 3.7.  This includes 5 events of magnitude larger than 3, with 34 events of magnitude 2 to 3, and 430 events of magnitude less than 2.  There have been multiple personal reports of ground shaking from observations inside Yellowstone National Park and in neighboring communities in Montana and Idaho for some of the larger events.  Earthquake swarms of this nature are relatively common in Yellowstone National Park. 

At this time the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory does not consider the swarm to be unusual and the earthquakes are likely related to tectonic fault sources.  Also there is no indication of premonitory volcanic or hydrothermal activity, but ongoing analyses will evaluate these different sources.

 

Information on earthquake can be viewed at the University of Utah Seismograph Stations: http://www.seis.utah.edu/.

Seismographic recordings from Yellowstone seismograph stations can be viewed online at: http://www.quake.utah.edu/helicorder/yell_webi.htm.

Persons who felt any of the earthquakes are encouraged to fill out a survey form on the USGS "Did You Feel It?" web site:  http://earthquake.usgs.gov/eqcenter/dyfi/.

Press Release

University of Utah Seismograph Stations

Released: January 18, 2010 09:30 AM MST

The University of Utah reports that a notable swarm of small earthquakes large as magnitude 2.7 has occurred throughout the evening of January 17 and morning of January 18, 2010, in Yellowstone National Park. The swarm is located about 10 miles northwest of Old Faithful, Wyoming and 9 miles southeast of West Yellowstone, MT. There were a total of 206 located earthquakes in the swarm of magnitude 2.7 to 0.5 as of 9AM Monday morning, and there has been one report of one of the larger earthquakes being felt in Yellowstone National Park.

Swarms of this nature are relatively common in this part of Yellowstone National Park. At this time we consider this swarm normal for tectonic related sources in the volcanic setting of Yellowstone and not an indication of premonitory volcanic or hydrothermal activity, but ongoing analyses will evaluate these different sources.

Information on earthquake can be viewed at the University of Utah Seismograph Stations: http://www.seis.utah.edu/.

Seismographic recordings from Yellowstone seismograph stations can be viewed online at: http://quake.utah.edu/helicorder/yell_webi.htm.

Persons who felt any of the earthquakes are encouraged to fill out a survey form on the USGS "Did You Feel It?" web site:  http://earthquake.usgs.gov/eqcenter/dyfi/.

Press Release

University of Utah Seismograph Stations

Released: December 29, 2008 05:00 PM MST

The University of Utah Seismograph Stations reports that a notable swarm of earthquakes has been underway since December 26 beneath Yellowstone Lake in Yellowstone National Park, three to six miles south-southeast of Fishing Bridge, Wyoming. This energetic sequence of events was most intense on December 27, when the largest number of events of magnitude 3 and larger occurred.

The largest of the earthquakes was a magnitude 3.9 (revised from magnitude 3.8) at 10:15 pm MST on Dec. 27. The sequence has included nine events of magnitude 3 to 3.9 and approximately 24 of magnitude 2 to 3 at the time of this release. A total of more than 250 events large enough to be located have occurred in this swarm. Reliable depths of the larger events are up to a few miles. Visitors and National Park Service (NPS) employees in the Yellowstone Lake area reported feeling the largest of these earthquakes.

Earthquakes are a common occurrence in the Yellowstone National Park area, an active volcanic-tectonic area averaging 1,000 to 2,000 earthquakes a year. Yellowstone's 10,000 geysers and hot springs are the result of this geologic activity. A summary of the Yellowstone's volcanic history is available on the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory web site (listed below). This December 2008 earthquake sequence is the most intense in this area for some years and is centered on the east side of the Yellowstone caldera. Scientists cannot identify any causative fault or other feature without further analysis. Seismologists continue to monitor and analyze the data and will issue new information if the situation warrants it.

The University of Utah operates a seismic network in Yellowstone National Park in conjunction with the National Park Service and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). These three institutions are partners in the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory.

Data are transmitted to the University in real-time by radio and satellite links from a network of 28 seismographs in the Yellowstone area and are available on the web.  Seismologists continue to analyze data from this swarm of earthquakes and provide updates to the NPS and USGS and to the public via the following web pages.

Information on U.S. earthquake activity including Yellowstone can be viewed at the U.S. Geological Survey web site: http://earthquake.usgs.gov/eqcenter/recenteqsus/

Information on earthquakes can also be viewed at the University of Utah Seismograph Stations: http://www.seis.utah.edu/.

Seismographic recordings from Yellowstone seismograph stations can be viewed online at: http://www.quake.utah.edu/helicorder/heli/yellowstone/index.html.

Persons who felt any of the earthquakes are encouraged to fill out a survey form on the USGS "Did You Feel It?" web site:  http://earthquake.usgs.gov/eqcenter/dyfi/.

Geologic information, maps, and monitoring information, for Yellowstone can be found on the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory web site at: http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/yvo/.

Press Release

University of Utah Seismograph Stations

Released: December 27, 2008 04:40 PM MST

The University of Utah Seismograph Stations reports that a swarm of small earthquakes of magnitude 3.5 and smaller is occurring beneath Yellowstone Lake in Yellowstone National Park, five to nine miles south-southeast of Fishing Bridge, Wyoming. The swarm began yesterday afternoon, Dec. 26, and has continued and intensified today. The two largest earthquakes in this swarm have been shocks of magnitude 3.5 and 3.4 which occurred at 1:17 and 1:26 pm MST, respectively, today. Many smaller earthquakes have also occurred, including three events this morning of magnitude 2.5 to 2.8 and a magnitude 3.2 event at 3:30 pm MST. Some of the earthquakes in the swarm have been reported felt by people in the Yellowstone Lake area. Swarms of this nature are relatively common in this part of Yellowstone Park.

Information on the earthquake can be viewed at the University of Utah Seismograph Stations: http://www.seis.utah.edu/.

Recordings from a nearby Yellowstone seismograph station can be viewed online at: http://www.quake.utah.edu/helicorder/heli/yellowstone/index.html.

Press Release

University of Utah Seismograph Stations

Released: March 25, 2008 07:25 AM MDT

The University of Utah Seismograph Stations reports that a light earthquake of magnitude 4.1 occurred at 05:59 AM on March 25, 2008 (MDT) in Yellowstone National Park. The epicenter of the shock was located 19 miles NE of Fishing Bridge, WY. Two earthquakes of magnitude 3.0 or greater have occurred within 16 mi of the epicenter of this event since 1962. The largest of these events was a magnitude 3.5 on July 20, 1992, 4.0 mi NE of Fishing Bridge, WY. This event has been reported felt in Pahaska Tepee, outside the east entrance to Yellowstone National Park and in southwest Montana as well as in western Wyoming.

The location of the earthquake has been analyzed by a seismologist.

Persons who felt the earthquake are encouraged to fill out a survey form on the USGS Community Felt reports web site: http://pasadena.wr.usgs.gov/shake/imw/STORE/X13060_08/ciim_display.html.

Information on the earthquake can be viewed at the University of Utah Seismograph Stations: http://www.seis.utah.edu/.

Recordings from a nearby Yellowstone seismograph station can be viewed online at: http://www.quake.utah.edu/helicorder/heli/yellowstone/index.html.

Press Release

University of Utah Seismograph Stations

Released: January 09, 2008 04:00 PM MST

The University of Utah Seismograph Stations reports a minor earthquake of magnitude 3.7 occurred at 02:37 PM on January 09, 2007 (MST) in Yellowstone National Park. The epicenter of the shock was located 11 miles NW of Madison Junction, WY and 12 miles northeast of West Yellowstone, MT. This event was preceded by two magnitude 2.9 earthquakes at 01:25 pm and 01:48 pm (MST) and is part of an ongoing sequence of earthquakes primarily of magnitudes less than 2.0 that began with the 01:25 PM event. A magnitude 3.6 earthquake occurred in the same location on December 30, 2007.

At this time we consider the earthquakes in this series typical for a tectonic-fault related sequence and not an indication of volcanic activity but ongoing analyses will evaluate these different sources.

Persons who felt the earthquake are encouraged to fill out a survey form on the USGS Community Felt reports web site: http://pasadena.wr.usgs.gov/shake/imw/.

Information on the earthquake can be viewed at the University of Utah Seismograph Stations: http://www.seis.utah.edu/.

Recordings from a nearby Yellowstone seismograph station can be viewed online at: http://www.quake.utah.edu/helicorder/heli/yellowstone/index.html.

Press Release

University of Utah Seismograph Stations

Released: December 30, 2007 09:22 PM MST

The University of Utah Seismograph Stations reports that a minor earthquake of magnitude 3.6 occurred at 08:29 PM on December 30, 2007 (MST) in Yellowstone National Park. The epicenter of the shock was located 11 miles NW of Madison Junction, WY and 12 miles northeast of West Yellowstone, MT. As of the time of this press release there have been 13 aftershocks with magnitudes ranging from 0.5 to 2.4. These earthquakes are considered typical for a tectonic-fault related sequence and are not an indication of volcanic activity. A total of 28 earthquakes of magnitude 3.0 or greater have occurred within 25 km of the epicenter of this area of western Yellowstone National Park since 1962. The largest of these events was a magnitude 4.2 on November 23, 2000, 2 miles NNW of Norris Junction, WY.

Those who felt the earthquake are encouraged to fill out a survey form on the USGS Community Felt reports web site: http://pasadena.wr.usgs.gov/shake/imw/.

Information on the earthquake can be viewed at the University of Utah Seismograph Stations: http://www.seis.utah.edu/. Recordings from a nearby Yellowstone seismograph station can be viewed online at: http://www.quake.utah.edu/helicorder/heli/yellowstone/index.html.

Press Release

University of Utah Seismograph Stations

Released: August 21, 2003 1:46 AM MDT

The University of Utah Seismograph Stations reports that a magnitude 4.4 earthquake occurred at 01:46 a.m. (MDT) on Thursday, August 21. The epicenter of the shock was located near Huckleberry Mountain in Wyoming, 8 miles southeast of the south entrance to Yellowstone National Park. The earthquake was reported felt in Yellowstone National Park at the south entrance and at Grant Village. It occurred in an area of relatively low seismicity.

Those who felt the quake are encouraged to fill out a survey form on the Seismograph Stations web site: www.quake.utah.edu.

Please click here for a link to "Did you feel it?" The Community Internet Intensity Survey.

 

 

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Press Release

University of Utah Seismograph Stations

Alaska Quake Seems to Trigger Yellowstone Jolts Small Tremors Rattle National Park After Big Quake 2,000 Miles Away
Released November 04, 2002

 

 

November 4, 2002 -- A major, magnitude-7.9 earthquake that rocked Alaska on Sunday apparently triggered scores of earthquakes some 2,000 miles away at Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming.

By 8:30 a.m. MST Monday Nov. 4 - about 17 hours after the Alaskan quake - more than 200 small earthquakes had been detected occurring in clusters throughout the Yellowstone area. The quakes were recorded by the Yellowstone seismic network operated by the University of Utah Seismograph Stations.

The smallest events were of magnitude less than 0 and the largest of about magnitude 2.5. National Park Service rangers at Old Faithful and Canyon Village reported feeling some of the earthquakes.

While the data are preliminary, they suggest that the Yellowstone earthquakes may have been triggered by the passage of large seismic waves generated by the Alaskan earthquake more than 3,200 kilometers (almost 2,000 miles) from the park. The apparent triggering is suggested by the fact the Yellowstone activity began within a half hour of the Alaska earthquake, which hit at 3:12 p.m. MST Nov. 3 (1:12 p.m. local time in Alaska).

There also are preliminary reports the Alaska quake may have triggered smaller tremors at The Geysers geothermal area in northern California.

Scientists once believed that an earthquake at one location could not trigger earthquakes at distant sites. But that belief was shattered in 1992 when the magnitude-7.3 Landers earthquake in California's Mojave Desert triggered a swarm of quakes more than 800 miles away at Yellowstone, as well as other jolts near Mammoth Lakes, Calif., and Yucca Mountain, Nev.

The apparent triggering of the Yellowstone tremors by the Alaska quake "confirms what we are beginning to see worldwide - that earthquakes can be triggered by other earthquakes at great distances, more so than we had thought before," said Robert. B. Smith, a University of Utah professor of geology and geophysics and coordinating scientist for the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory.

Clusters of small earthquakes in time and space are common in Yellowstone. However, the clusters of Yellowstone earthquakes following the Alaskan mainshock extended across much of the park and were not concentrated in a single location.

The small Yellowstone quakes are not considered to pose a threat to the public, but are of great interest to scientists who want to confirm if they were triggered and understand how. Investigation is ongoing and may take some time to complete, said Sue Nava, seismograph network manager at the University of Utah Seismograph Stations.

There has been some suggestion that seismic waves from a large, distant quake may jostle the ground at Yellowstone, triggering small quakes by moving the hydrothermal fluids responsible for Yellowstone geysers and hot springs.

Those wishing to view seismograms of the Alaska earthquake and those in Yellowstone recorded on the Yellowstone seismic network may go to the web site: http://www.seis.utah.edu/helicorder/heli/yellowstone/index.html

The U.S. Geological Survey's National Earthquake Information Center website has information on the Alaskan earthquake that can be viewed at: http://neic.usgs.gov/neis/bulletin/neic_lbbl.html

The Yellowstone seismic network is operated by the University of Utah Seismograph Stations as a partner in the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory (YVO). Information on YVO and earthquake activity in Yellowstone can be found at: http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/yvo/

 

 

 

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Press Release

University of Utah Seismograph Stations

Released: November 24, 2000

The University of Utah Seismograph Stations reports that a magnitude 4.2 earthquake occurred at 9:20 p.m. MST this evening in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. The epicenter of the shock was located about 1 mile north of Norris Junction. The earthquake was reported felt at Madison Junction and a Mammoth, Wyoming in the northern region of Yellowstone National Park. No damage has been reported. The event is in an area that experienced an M 5.9 event in 1975 that caused damage and is located in an area noted for earthquake swarms.

For information on earthquakes in Yellowstone, go to www.quake.utah.edu.

Please click here for a link to "Did you feel it?" The Community Internet Intensity Survey.

 

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Press Release

University of Utah Seismograph Stations

Increased Earthquake Activity In Yellowstone National Park
July-August 2000


Click here to access information about swarm activity in Norris Geyser Basin. For further information about this earthquake sequence, please contact Dr. Robert Smith, rbsmith@mines.utah.

 

 

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